• Category Archives DoFPS
  • Himalayan Palm Civet electrocuted at Kurizam

    An electrocuted Himalayan Palm Civet at Kurizam, Mongar
    An electrocuted Himalayan Palm Civet at Kurizam, Mongar

    A Himalayan Palm Civet (Puguma larvata Himlton-Smith, 1827) was found dead after being electrocuted on 27 September 2016 at Kurizam, Mongar in a Chirpine forest (N27°16′21.1″, E091°11′36.3″, 569m) near its human settlement. One of the residents reported the incident through a phone to the Central Park Range Office, Phrumsengla National Park.

    Continue reading  Post ID 6457

    1,364 total views, no views today


  • Regional Training of Trainers programme on Horticultural Chain Management

    Participants with the chief guest during the concluding session
    Participants with the chief guest during the concluding session

    30 September, Paro: Participants from seven countries expressed their appreciation for organising space to share experiences as change agents as well as for the knowledge gained through the lessons and resources during the Regional Training of Trainers programme on Horticultural Chain Management. The interaction among the participants gave an opportunity to share post harvest issues and solutions to minimize post harvest losses.

    Continue reading  Post ID 6457

    795 total views, no views today


  • National Symposium on Zero Poaching held

    img_4291-minSeptember 28-29, Thimphu: Poaching and illegal wildlife trade are the most serious and immediate threat to Asia’s many charismatic and iconic species, such as tiger, rhino and elephants. The steady draining of biological resources from Asian countries has continued largely unabated and thus negated the increasingly high conservation investments made by us. This should be of no surprise, given the increasingly sophisticated financing mechanisms, breadth and resources deployed by international poaching networks themselves. Recent studies have shown that illegal wildlife trade is one of the top-five of most lucrative illicit economies globally; recently its value was estimated to fall within the range of US$50-150 billion per year.

    A huge proportion of this activity occurs in Asia, and there is broad recognition that this threat will not recede without a clear region-wide up-scale of response.

    Continue reading  Post ID 6457

    803 total views, no views today